The day the Food Controller banned the buttery rowie

Lenathehyena's Blog

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Rowie, buttery or Aberdeen roll

Threat to Aberdeen’s Morning Delicacy

ran the headline on an inside page of the local press on 27th August 1917 under pictures of some of the latest local men killed in the Great War – Trimmer Adam Clark of the navy, private William McRobb and gunner James Hutcheson from Turriff.

The rowie warning also appeared below an article on a joint socialist proposal to end this horrific war. Its main thrust was a need for independence for Belgium, Alsace and Lorraine, Polish unity, self-determination for Armenia, India, Egypt, Ireland and Algiers, formation of a Balkan Confederation, a League of Nations and a hands-off approach to German trade – all in all a ‘people’s peace’ they called it.  Of course self-determination and independence are no longer supported by some of today’s ‘socialists’. As with many things a lot has changed in the intervening one hundred years…

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30 years ago was the Wessex helicopter crash on Ben More and the tragic loss of Harry Lawrie Killin Mountain Rescue Team Leader.

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“Lest we forget”

This is a story that few will know outside the small group within Scottish Mountain Rescue. I still feel it needs retelling and how we should never take the Mountain Rescue Teams or SAR Helicopters for granted and how easily it can all go wrong.

1987 Harry Lawrie Killin MRT “Lest we forget”

Harry Lawrie Killin MRT RIP Harry Lawrie Killin MRT RIP In memory of Harry Lawrie BEM Team Leader Killin Mountain Rescue Team.

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30 years ago on the first of February 1987 a Wessex Helicopter from RAF Leuchars crashed on Ben More near Crainlarich this is part of the story.

The weather on that day the 1 st of February was wonderful, blue skies and rock hard snow meant a great weekend for climbing and mountaineering. We knew there would be plenty of callouts that weekend but the weather was so perfect that the helicopters would be able to cope…

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Misconduct & Mistakes

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It occurs to me that, from time to time, police officers make mistakes.

It also occurs to me that we live in a world that is increasingly unforgiving of them when they do.

There are, of course, any number of reasons why police officers might get it wrong:

(1) Because they are human

Though my wife comes close, I’ve yet to encounter an entirely perfect human being.

I’ve certainly never met a perfect police officer.

But I have known officers who make mistakes. I look at one in the mirror every morning before I go to work.

They make mistakes because they are tired; because they are stretched; because they are under pressure; because they aren’t in possession of all the facts; because their instincts have let them down on this occasion; because hindsight is a wonderful thing.

Because they are human.

(2) Because they operate in the hurting places

As…

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Is childbirth a risky business?

patientsafetyfirst

I’ve been quite shocked recently by some of the information and messages I’ve seen via social media relating to the risks associated with pregnancy and childbirth.

For example, this piece written by Milli Hill states

If you believe everything you read, then you probably think that childbirth is one of the riskiest activities any human can undertake. Actually, it isn’t, and statistically you’re massively more likely to meet your maker behind the wheel of your motor.

Others have re-tweeted the piece and are keen to promote a similar message. Tweeting a graphic from the NHS Choices ‘Atlas of Risk’, Sheena Byrom states

‘Let’s put pregnancy & birth in UK into perspective. It is NOT a risky business’

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But let’s look a bit more closely at the figures. In the UK, in 2009 there were 4,125 still born babies and 2,511 neonatal deaths (6,636 in total). This compares with the…

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Mountain Weather Information Service – if you care write or email info below! Any views?

Apparently Mountain Weather Information Service set to close as result of losing funding. Pls read David’s blog and contact those responsible

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MWIS is asking those in the mountain community who use MWIS forecasts to declare their support for MWIS by writing to Shaun Roberts, Head of Glenmore Lodge (SportScotland) (enquiries@glenmorelodge.org.uk) and Richard Orrell at the Met Office (Richard.Orrell@metoffice.gov.uk) asking them to reinstate MWIS funding, and copying in geoff@mwis.org.uk

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Jean’s Hut – a lost Cairngorm bothy

Interesting article. Remember visiting here in late 1970’s

cairngormwanderer

Jean's Hut, Coire an Lochain, Cairngorm Jean’s Hut in Coire an Lochain, date unknown.

Of all the ‘lost’ bothies of the Cairngorms,  Jean’s Hut seems one of  the one most brought up in folk’s recollections.

Not one I was ever at myself, although it didn’t finally disappear until the ’80s, but there are some good historical pictures from Reg Popham and Angus Robson which are worth sharing here.

Jean’s Hut started out in Coire Cas on Cairngorm, only later being moved to the location most people remember in Coire an Lochain.

It was gifted by Dr Alasdair Smith in memory of his daughter Jean who died in a skiing accident in 1948, having fallen when the edges of her skis failed to bite while traversing a steep, icy slope.

It was built in 1951, roughly where the White Lady Shieling stands now.

Angus Robson, who contacted me in response to another post about bygone Cairngorm bothies

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